A glossary for social epidemiology. (EN) 2019-02-08

A glossary for social epidemiology Rating: 4,4/10 148 reviews

Social Epidemiology

a glossary for social epidemiology

The incidence rate among the exposed proportion of the population, divided by the incidence rate in the unexposed portion of the population, gives a relative measure of the effect of a given exposure. Flexible work schedules may have positive consequences for workers who can use them to accommodate work to family and social life. Sometimes occupational organisations provide job placement services, training, pensions and health benefits. Changes or differences in one characteristic are studied in relation to changes or differences in others, without the intervention of the investigator. The carrier state may occur in an individual with an infection that is inapparent throughout its course known as asymptomatic carrier , or during the incubation period, convalescence, and postconvalescence of an individual with a clinically recognizable disease. These proportions are not mortality rates, since the denominator is all deaths, not the population in which the deaths occurred.

Next

A glossary for the social epidemiology of work organisation: Part 2 Terms from the sociology of work and organisations — Korea University

a glossary for social epidemiology

Occupation is a social role, a set of expectations with respect to the knowledge, skills and experience of workers. Sometimes the preferred word, as it may escape sensationalism associated with the word epidemic. However, intersecting social science fields often use health and disease in order to explain specifically social phenomenon such as the growth of lay movements , while social epidemiologists generally use social concepts in order to explain patterns of health in the population. An interview is a face-to-face meeting in which an investigator asks a person questions in order to obtain information. Thus, the exposures related to the job may differ by employment, social class and marital status, as well as by the family demands associated to these roles, and the degree of control that people have to negotiate in stressful situations seems to be critical.


Next

A glossary for social epidemiology

a glossary for social epidemiology

It attempts to determine which of the society's characteristics influence the dispersion of disease and health and how they work. We could perhaps learn from this in community child health as well. Social epidemiology: Questionable answers and answerable questions. To address obscurity of causal mechanisms in social epidemiology, it has been proposed to integrate into social epidemiology. The Microsoft Excel file extension for this type of data is. Currently, precarious employment is becoming more common in developed economies and is widespread in developing economies.

Next

A glossary for the social epidemiology of work organisation: Part 2 Terms from the sociology of work and organisations — Korea University

a glossary for social epidemiology

Both numerator and denominator are limited to the specified group. May be applied not only to survival as such, but also to the persistence of freedom from a disease, or complication or some other endpoint. If you Journal Child: Care, Health and Development — Wiley Published: Jan 1, 2002. It is not possible to give a summary of the rest which does it any justice, but the terms defined include theoretical concepts such as the political economy of health, ecosocial theories of disease distribution, and social determinants of health; broad philosophical issues such as human rights, discrimination, gender and sexism, and racism; technical definitions of methods such as multilevel modelling, social class determination, and stress; and discussions of terms such as poverty, society, social exclusion, and life course perspectives. A Glossary for Social Epidemiology, J Epidemiol Community Health 2001; 55:693-700. A Glossary for Social Epidemiology, J Epidemiol Community Health 2001; 55:693-700. The establishment of a glossary that encompasses this broad interdisciplinary field of enquiry within social epidemiology is a step in this direction.

Next

A glossary for social epidemiology

a glossary for social epidemiology

Along with gender, some family domain pressures, such as the presence of young children and spouse time in paid work, and work domain pressures, such as number of hours worked per week, are associated with work—family conflict. Tackling this task requires attention to theories, concepts, and methods conducive to illuminating intimate links between our bodies and the body politic; toward this end, the glossary below provides a selection of critical terms for the field. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1186. A particular percentile, say the 5th percentile, is a cut point with 5 percent of the observations below it and the remaining 95% of the observations above it. Glossary of Epidemiology Terms age-adjusted mortality rate: A mortality rate statistically modified to eliminate the effect of different age distributions in the different populations.

Next

Glossary of Epidemiology Terms

a glossary for social epidemiology

Work in the informal economy poses considerable health risks because the working conditions are unregulated and workers do not get benefits. Racism, sexism, and social class: implications for studies of health, disease, and well-being. Bringing context back into epidemiology: variables and fallacies in multilevel analysis. These sets become known to employers and workers, and serve to organise labour markets; they become, for instance, categories in job vacancy advertisements. By observing individuals with brain cancer in their natural settings, Tina may be able to learn more information about the society that they live in. Occupation The meaning of occupation is usually taken for granted, but the relevance of occupation varies from place to place. The infant mortality rate is usually expressed per 1,000 live births.

Next

Glossary

a glossary for social epidemiology

A Glossary for Social Epidemiology, J Epidemiol Community Health 2001; 55:693-700. The numerator is the number of deaths attributed to a specific cause during a specified time interval; the denominator is the size of the population at the midpoint of the time interval. Health inequalities and social group differences: what should we measure? Two textbooks are also listed, namely and. A glossary for social epidemiology. Many works cited here e. Some shift workers rotate shifts, cycling work times from day to evening to night and back to day. In common use, the span of values from smallest to largest.

Next

A glossary for the social epidemiology of work organisation: Part 3, Terms from the sociology...

a glossary for social epidemiology

These concepts are drawn from economics, business and sociology. Health inequality: An introduction to, theories, concepts, and methods. A Glossary for Social Epidemiology, J Epidemiol Community Health 2001; 55:693-700. For instance, though the boundaries are sometimes blurry between social epidemiology and some areas of psychiatric or psychosocial epidemiology, a specific section on these topics was not included here; however, a number of the texts cited in this bibliography would also belong to those subdisciplines. A Glossary for Social Epidemiology, J Epidemiol Community Health 2001; 55:693-700. Income inequality and mortality: importance to health of individual income, psychosocial environment, or material conditions. Poisson model A regression model used for count data.

Next